Uncertainty

The willingness to be uncertain is highly valued in Field practice. Why? Because so often our beliefs and conclusions run contrary to our desires. How ready we seem to believe and fear the worst, to have faith in unwanted rather than fulfilling outcomes. In such cases, uncertainty is a giant step toward alignment; it loosens the grip of the daunting conclusion and opens us to believing and receiving something better. One way we get to uncertainty when we find ourselves believing something we don’t want to believe is to ask ourselves, “Do I really know this?” If you’re honest, you’ll see that the answer is always “No” in cases where you’re believing something you don’t want to believe. The universe is an endless run-on sentence of unfolding creation, and you jumped in and put a period where you don’t want one. The willingness to be uncertain for the sake of alignment, to live “suspended in the moment” as Florence Scovel Shinn says it, is the meekness and state of being “poor in spirit” that Jesus extols in the Sermon on the Mount as the preconditions of inheriting the earth (manifestation, fulfillment).

You can put this to the test easily enough. Consider any conclusion you’ve accepted that you don’t like. Ask yourself, “Do I really know this?” You’ll see that you don’t, that you’ve assumed certain meanings, significances, and implications through which the undesirable reality is constructed. Bring these into the cool shade of uncertainty, rest in the not-knowing a while, and the situation that corresponds to the old belief or conclusion will change of its own accord. Uncertainty is not an end in itself in Field practice, but a path to an inner claiming. We are willing not to know long enough to allow unwanted beliefs and conclusions to fall away, so we can embrace our ideal self with an open and willing heart. It is not so important to be right. It is not wise to prepare for the worst, for our preparations are not made in isolation, but go forth nonlocally to craft the very thing for which we prepare. Dare to believe what it pleases you to believe, and leave all facts and worldly effects to the Field. The only requirement is that you be willing to consider that the conclusion you’ve harbored that hurts you may be no more than one way to look at the situation, and that there are others, and in particular that something entirely different may be unfolding for your greater fulfillment.


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